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Are There Supplements/Natural Remedies that Would Help My Dog?

This is a question our veterinary staff gets asked a lot at our clinic! Dogs are dependent on their pet parents to supply everything necessary for them to be healthy and happy. They need a healthy diet to support growth, healthy bones and teeth, a shiny thick coat, a strong immune system to ward off diseases, and a high energy level.

Safe supplements can be added to your dog’s food to improve its nutritional value and to assist in the treatment of various health issues. As well, there are many natural remedies that can be introduced to enhance a dog’s happiness and well-being, or are starting to develop problems as they age.

It’s best that you always consult your veterinarian about supplements and natural remedies. 

Quality food for your dog is a good investment and it is important for your dog to have a high-quality well-balanced diet.

Specific problems require special supplements

  • Glucosamine – This is the most commonly recommended supplement for dogs with stiff joints and mobility issues or for dogs with arthritis. It helps to reduce inflammation.
  • Omega 3 Fatty Acids – This is the second most popular supplement. It essential fatty acids that are needed to improve a dog’s coat, skin health, and help reduce inflammation.
  • Antioxidants – These supplements, such as vitamins C and E, help reduce the negative effects of aging, improve memory, reduce the risk of heart disease, and reduce inflammation. Good quality well balance diets contain these important supplements.
  • Probiotics – These supplements increase the growth of good bacteria and yeasts that live in the digestive system. Probiotics are especially important to restore balance in the digestive system after a stressful incident such as vomiting, diarrhea, or the use of antibiotics, etc.

Be cautious with supplements

  • Use only supplements made for animals and prescribed by your veterinarian. Never substitute the dog supplements with those intended for human consumption; those are sometimes dangerous for dogs.
  • Carefully follow the dosages at the direction of your veterinarian. Never exceed the recommended doses.
  • Remember that supplements do not produce overnight results. Be patient and expect results to show up slowly with regular usage over time.
  • Don’t ever expect impossible claims to be true. Supplements cannot replace prescription medication when your dog is ill, and they cannot cure cancer or any other serious disease.

Add to Your Pet’s Health and Happiness with Natural Remedies

We all know that it is important for your pet’s health and happiness to provide a balanced diet, and to give your pet as much companionship as your schedule will allow, coupled with sufficient daily exercise. However, there are natural remedies you can also use to keep your four-legged best friend mentally healthy and alert and to calm your pet when necessary.

  1. Change-up the exercise routine to keep your dog alert. Dogs love routine and, when you start on your walk, will turn and pause at all the usual places; however, it is a good idea to introduce some variety now and then. Take a new route or reverse the one you usually take.
  • If throw-and-fetch makes your pooch happy, find a place where you can play the game with a ball or a Frisbee or another suitable toy.
  • If your dog loves to splash in the water, head to the beach or a place where dogs are welcome to swim and enjoy the water.
  • Add a few extra short walks to your day, or take doggy on a run, or to a park where he or she can run off-leash.
  • Allow your dog time to stop and smell the roses or the stinky stuff—but stop him or her from eating or rolling in whatever it is!
  1. Mental stimulation. Give your dog some opportunities for mental exercise and stimulation.
  • Dog parks are great places for your pooch to interact with other dogs.
  • If your dog doesn’t make friends easily, try the occasional doggy date with a friendly neighbourhood dog and owner.
  • Teach your dog tricks to help spice up his or her life. Start with the basic commands of “sit,” “stay,” and “down,” and to come when his or her name is called. You can then move on to teaching your dog to shake hands, roll over and play dead, or to bark on command. You will need lots of patience and treats, and a signal such as snapping your fingers, or a hand signal, or a word. Keep the sessions short—no more than 10 minutes—and stop if you or your dog find yourselves losing patience or stressing out.
  • Add new toys and interactive puzzle toys to your doggy’s toy box.
  1. Music can help calm a stressed dog. If you have a nervous dog or one that becomes anxious when travelling or when a routine is changed, try adding some music to the scene. Yes, dogs do like music, especially classical music. Bach is particularly soothing and seems to be a favourite with most animals. Interestingly, they don’t react well to heavy metal, rock, hip hop, or jazz.
  1. Massages and grooming. Grooming your pet is great for bonding, and so are massages.
  • Grooming: Use a brush daily or as often as you can to keep your dog’s coat clean, to keep it free of mats and tangles, and to reduce unpleasant smells.
  • Relaxing: You can help dogs relax by petting and massaging them when they are stressed, such as during a thunderstorm or when they are restless. Pet your dog from the top of the head with long, even strokes down the spine and over the tail. Repeat this motion several times, increasing the pressure gradually—but not on the lower spine—and then rest your hands on the head and the high point on your dog’s hips. These areas control relaxation responses.
  • Sore joints: Massage can ease the stiffness and pain in a dog’s joints resulting from overexertion, inactivity, or aging. Pet the areas around the joints to warm the locations and then apply gentle compression to them. Finish off by gently petting and stroking the areas again.

Supplements can be added to increase the nutritional value of your dog’s diet and to ease various health problems. Be sure and check with your veterinarian to make sure the choices being made are appropriate ones. Other natural remedies can be used to enhance your pet’s well-being, alertness, and happiness. At the end of the day, your dog will reward you with a wagging tail and lots of affection!

Creative Commons Attribution: Permission is granted to repost this article in its entirety with credit to Hastings Veterinary Hospital and a clickable link back to this page.

House Training & Crate Training Tips for Dogs

Bringing home a new puppy or an older dog means opening up a whole new world of love, excitement, and experiences! We hope these house and crate training tips for dogs will help make life easier for everyone in your home, including your new pet.

House Training Your Dog Requires Consistency and Encouragement

Puppies and older dogs are happiest when they know exactly what their owners require of them, which means it’s a good idea to plan out a schedule. By nature dogs tend to try very hard to please you, so they may soon enough catch on to the times you expect them to eat, play, sleep, and go outside to relieve themselves or go out for a walk. If you are careful to stick to the scheduled times, all while taking your dog’s age and size into consideration and using patience and rewards, you can teach your brand new member of the family what is expected of him or her in a few weeks or months.

When your dog is fully house trained, life will be happier and easier for everyone. In some cases though, the training process will usually take four to six months and occasionally up to a year before full training status can be accomplished.

When to Start House Training

For puppies you can start house training when they are between 12 and 16 weeks old. A general rule of thumb is that puppies can control their bladders for one hour for every month of age, which means three-month-old puppies should be able to hold in their urine for three hours. Smaller breeds have smaller bladders and can’t control them as long as bigger breeds can, however, so keep this in mind as well.

If you’ve adopted an adult dog or a senior, there’s a chance they may have learned bad habits from an earlier living situation before coming to your home. If this is the case, you may have to spend some time helping your new pet unlearn their bad habits by starting basic training all over again, just as if they were young puppies. Be prepared.

Space

Confine your puppy to a particular space and routine while house training.

  • A puppy (or an older pooch) should be kept in a large crate, or in a particular room where there is no carpet, or on a leash near you where you can keep an eye on your new family member. You can spread paper in one area (use several layers) of a room, but make sure your dog has space left to play, sleep, and eat in the room.
  • When taken outside, your dog should be on a leash and taken to the same spot for elimination each time.
  • As your dog learns that outside is where elimination is supposed to occur, you can give your best friend a little more freedom to move around in the house.

Times of the Day

Always take a puppy outside first thing in the morning and again 30 minutes later, and continue with 30-minute intervals all day.

  • When your new puppy grows up a little, you can extend their schedule to two-hour intervals.
  • Also, remember to take your pet outside after meals, after naps, after playtime, before being left alone, and at night just before bed.

Mealtimes

Offer food to your dog on a regular schedule, which may be three or four times a day when the puppy is really young and small, and remove any leftover food after mealtime.

  • Remove the water bowl about two hours before bedtime to lessen the chances that your pooch will need to go outside in the middle of the night—most dogs can sleep through the night. If you do have to take your dog outside, turn on very few lights, don’t talk, don’t play, and put him or her back to bed as soon as you return inside.
  • If dogs are fed at the same time each day, it is likely that they also need to eliminate at the same time each day, which can speed up the house training process.

Outdoor Trips

For any walks or trips outside, use a leash and take your puppy to the same spot each time if they need to eliminate. The scent will help remind your puppy of what is expected.

  • Use the same word or phrase each time the puppy is eliminating so that the word or words become a signal to them of what to do.
  • Give your dog praise and a reward as soon as their business is finished—not after you go back inside the house. That’s too long for dogs to wait to be able to associate the reward with the action. Also, be careful not to give rewards before they’ve finished or they may be so happy that they stop and don’t remember to finish until they are back inside.
  • During house training time, don’t take your dog for a walk until the job has been done in the regular spot. This will help reinforce the training.

In the Event of Accidents

Expect accidents to happen from time to time while house training your dog. Watch for the signs—barking, squatting, circling, or scratching at the door—that your dog needs to go outside.

  • If your puppy starts to eliminate in the house, interrupt the act by quickly and firmly saying, “Outside”—without yelling or threatening them—and immediately take your dog outside to finish. Never be upset or angry at them, and don’t ever rub your puppy’s nose in the spot or they may become scared to eliminate in your presence. When you go back inside, clean it up.
  • If you discover an area in the house that has been soiled, it’s too late to do anything but clean it up and make sure there is no lingering odor that may encourage further accidents. Again, never ever force your dog to smell the spot as punishment or yell at them after the fact; not only is this unnecessary but your dog won’t understand why you’re angry, they’ll only understand that you are angry. This, in turn, can cause a dog to distrust and dislike you as their owner. Always be gentle when house training, even if an accident occurs.

How to Make Crate Training a Happy Experience

Crates are great for keeping your dog safe and confined when they’re young and before being house trained. Crates are also useful when transporting your dog in the car or anywhere a dog isn’t free to run. Buy a crate big enough to allow your dog to stand, turn around, and lie down in.

The main rule when crate training is to make sure the crate is associated with happy experiences and is viewed as a “safe, comfortable place” by your dog. Take your time and don’t expect miracles overnight.

6 Steps for Crate Training:

  1. Place the crate, door open, in the room with your pup, and put a toy and blanket inside. After your dog is used to having it in the room, place a treat inside and wait for puppy to go inside and explore. You may have to wait a few days.
  1. Put the dinner bowl near the crate and after a few days, put it inside. If your puppy enters freely and is comfortable, gradually move the food bowl to the back of the crate; if not so comfortable, put it right inside the door and move it back over a longer number of days.
  1. After a few days, close the door while puppy is eating and open it as soon as the meal is finished. Start leaving your dog inside for a minute or two after the meal is finished and then longer, but open the door immediately if there is any indication of unhappiness or unease. It means you should leave puppy inside for shorter intervals. Start over.
  1. If your puppy starts to cry or whine, don’t open the door until the whining stops or that becomes the way your dog trains you! You mustn’t let that happen. Pet your dog and offer a treat. Open the door while your dog is eating the treat.
  1. As before, gradually increase the time your dog is left inside when you are home and in the room, and then leave the room for a few minutes and then for longer periods. In time, you can coax your puppy inside with a treat and a command like, “crate time,” and leave him or her there for a few hours.
  1. If you want to crate train your puppy at night, keep the crate inside or near your bedroom so your pet doesn’t feel alone and abandoned. Over a period of weeks, you can move the crate further and further away until it is in the location you prefer.

House training and crate training are important responsibilities of dog owners. It is always best for you and your pet to work with a certified dog trainer. When you have accomplished these tasks and your dog is house trained and crate trained, you can rest easy knowing you have a very happy and well-adjusted dog!

Creative Commons Attribution: Permission is granted to repost this article in its entirety with credit to Hastings Veterinary Hospital and a clickable link back to this page.